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5 Exercise and Lifestyle Tips to Create a Happier and Healthier You this New Year

If you are trying to live a happier and healthier life this New Year, it’s not just enough to focus on the foods you eat. Exercise, sleep and social relationships are also important. Small changes to these areas can improve your overall health and wellbeing. Follow these 5 exercise and lifestyle tips to make your


If you are trying to live a happier and healthier life this New Year, it’s not just enough to focus on the foods you eat.

Exercise, sleep and social relationships are also important. Small changes to these areas can improve your overall health and wellbeing. Follow these 5 exercise and lifestyle tips to make your New Year’s wishes come true and be well on your way to becoming a happier and healthier you in 2020!

Read our article 10 Healthy Eating Tips to Get You Back on Track this New Year, Minus the Diet.

1. Be active on most, preferably all, days of the week.

Exercise is incredibly beneficial for our overall health and wellbeing. It promotes good cardiovascular and mental health and can also be used to strengthen and maintain our musculoskeletal system. Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines recommend that people be active on most, preferably all, days of each week. Aim to complete a mix of cardiovascular and strength-based exercise each week. And remember, any form of exercise is better than none!

2. Learn to love exercise.

Exercise shouldn’t be undertaken as a punishment for your dietary choices or solely for aesthetic purposes. It should be undertaken because you enjoy it and like the way it makes you feel. You shouldn’t pursue yoga if you do not understand The benefits of Mindfulness, because if you do not understand it completely, it would all be for nothing. Improve your relationship with exercise by finding a form of exercise that you love. Consider hiring a physiotherapist if you think you need more help with your workouts and
find out more here about how exercises can help you improve your body. Working out with a friend has also been shown to increase exercise enjoyment and help people stick with it long term.

3. Develop a healthy routine.

Success is determined by the things we do every day. This is particularly true in relation to improving our health, therefore the importance of developing a healthy routine to support lifestyle changes should not be overlooked. Develop a list of practical strategies that you can use to help prioritise your health and fitness. This may include scheduling a time to exercise, meal planning, limiting screen time at night and establishing a nighttime routine to ensure a good night’s sleep. Start using a plant-based protein powder to improve your workouts.

4. Get more sleep.

Because life is so busy, sleep can often be seen as less important than other activities, however it is essential for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Good quality sleep provides our body with a chance to rest, recharge and reset so that we can function at our best. Poor sleep can disrupt appetite hormones, reduce physical and mental performance and increase your risk of weight gain. Everybody thrives on a different amount of sleep; however, 7 hours seems to be the sweet spot for most adults.

5. Prioritise your relationships.

Social relationships are incredibly important for mental health and wellbeing. Having good social connections is associated with lower rates of anxiety and depression and higher self-esteem. Consider the relationships that you currently have, and the type of relationships that you would like to have. Invest time into building a group of people around you that care about you, and who you also care about. Your body and mind will reap the rewards.

Detox Diets Part 3: How to Support Your Body’s Natural Detox Ability

Detoxes and ‘cleanses’ are some of the most popular diets available. And while they probably won’t help you to lose any more weight than a good diet, or improve your body’s ability to remove toxins, certain nutrients and lifestyle changes can help to support your body’s own, amazing, innate detoxification pathways. Read our article ‘How


Detoxes and ‘cleanses’ are some of the most popular diets available. And while they probably won’t help you to lose any more weight than a good diet, or improve your body’s ability to remove toxins, certain nutrients and lifestyle changes can help to support your body’s own, amazing, innate detoxification pathways.

Read our article ‘How Dangerous are Common Toxins’ for a refresher on what toxins are and how they affect the body.

Reducing Toxins In Your Environment

There are many strategies that we can employ to help reduce our exposure to common toxins:

1. Choose supplements tested for heavy metals

Many supplement companies, including Nuzest, test their products to meet stringent guidelines for heavy metal contamination. When choosing a supplement always do your research first. Check the label to see what country the product originates from (manufacturing and monitoring systems for health supplements varies between countries) and if in doubt, contact the company direct.

2. Choose organic foods where possible

Organic does not always mean low in toxins and toxicants, however they are likely to be lower in pesticide and herbicide residue and environmental pollutants. If your budget allows, opt for organic produce where possible. And if not, make sure to wash your fruit and veg thoroughly before consuming in order to lower your risk of consuming unwanted toxins.

3. Choose foods from countries with more stringent quality controls

Some developing nations can have more relaxed environmental and pollution controls, and this can affect even ‘organic’ foods. It is safest to choose foods and materials from countries with more stringent environmental pollution laws and those known to have lower levels of heavy metals in groundwater and soil.

4. Reduce the use of plastics

Replace plastic storage containers with glass wherever possible. If using plastic, make sure that you opt for BPA-free plastic and always recycle properly. One of the most important things to remember is to only ever heat your food in containers that are deemed microwave-safe! This includes glass and microwavable safe ceramics and plastics. Current data indicates that BPA alternatives such as bisphenol B (BPB), bisphenol F (BPF), and bisphenol S (BPS) have comparative effects to BPA, so should also be avoided where possible42.

5. Exercise

Exercise can promote greater metabolic activity which may speed the clearance of toxins from the body. It is also useful to offset some of the negative effects that can result from some toxins and toxicants by helping to improve oxidative control, increase insulin sensitivity, and encourage the clearance of damaged and dysfunctional tissue from the body. Endurance exercise-trained rats are able to maintain glutathione status (an important antioxidant involved in detoxification) during paracetamol toxicity compared to untrained rats15.

6. Fasting

Occasional or intermittent fasting can help the body to deal with some of the effects of environmental toxins and toxicants by modulating inflammation, encouraging the removal of dysfunctional and damaged tissue, and improving antioxidant pathways.1620.

phase one and phase two liver detox pathways

Nutrients That Aid Detoxification

Many of the toxins that we can be exposed to promote oxidative and other damage in the body. So, nutrients that might help us to avoid accumulating toxins, encourage their detoxification and excretion, and reduce damage are of particular interest. Oxidation, for example, is a normal and essential part of many cellular processes, however excessive oxidation is damaging.

Our natural, internal antioxidant pathways rely on a healthy liver, and various micronutrient and macronutrient co-factors. Most of the research that has been performed on dietary and supplemental interventions that may help in various aspects of detox or resistance to toxic chemicals has been performed in animals (due mainly to the ethics of exposing humans to toxic chemicals!). Regardless, this research offers a glimpse into some nutritional interventions that might improve the resilience of the body. These findings are summarised under the sub-headings below.

Nutrients that may help to reduce the accumulation, and improve the excretion, of common toxins

  • Spirulina and dandelion may help to reduce mercury accumulation23. Spirulina with zinc increases the excretion of arsenic in chronic arsenic poisoning24, and absorbs cadmium25.
  •  Chlorella may be useful in inhibiting the absorption of dioxins via food and the reabsorption of dioxins stored already in the body in the intestinal tract, thus preventing the accumulation of dioxins within the body26. Research performed in mice also suggests that mercury excretion is enhanced by chlorella2728.
  • Milk thistle may help to reduce the entry of toxins into cells29,30.
  • Folate is critical to the metabolism of arsenic31.
  • Alpha-lipoic acid supports detoxification processes32.
  • Glycine was found to be effective for increasing glutathione (a powerful antioxidant) levels, and decreasing lead levels in bone (with extremely high doses of around 1g per kg bodyweight in subject animals)33.

Nutrients that may help to reduce oxidation and damage from toxins and toxicants

  • Treatment with cysteine, methionine, vitamin C and thiamine can reverse oxidative stress associated with arsenic exposure and result in a reduction in tissue arsenic level34.
  • Spirulina and dandelion enriched diets reduce lead and mercury-related oxidation23,35.
  • Spirulina, ginseng, onion and garlic decrease lipid peroxidation and increase endogenous antioxidant levels36,37.
  • Curcumin, resveratrol, Vitamin C, E, selenium and zinc and the bioflavonoid quercetin can effectively protect against cadmium-induced lipid peroxidation and reduce the adverse effect of cadmium on antioxidant status3840.
  • Curcumin significantly protects against lipid peroxidation induced by both lead and cadmium41.
  • Milk thistle reduces oxidative damage from toxicant exposure29,30.

Conclusion

The body has an amazing capacity to remove toxins and toxicants naturally from the body. Despite what you may be led to believe, detox pills and potions won’t do anything more than a good diet based on natural and unrefined foods. Lifestyle changes and dietary additions (such as Nuzest’s Good Green Stuff who’s formulation is inclusive of many of the nutrients mentioned above) can help to support your own internal detoxification pathways, thus helping your body work ‘as nature intended’. Eating a varied nutrient-dense, organic (where possible) diet and exercising regularly can help us to reduce damage from toxins and toxicants and optimise the excretion of any chemical nasties that we may be exposed to.

Detox Diets Part 2: How Dangerous Are Common Toxins?

What Are Toxins? Toxins are poisonous substances that are produced either within the body or by another organism (synthetically created ‘toxins’ are technically called toxicants). Are Toxins Dangerous? While they sound scary (and some are!), many toxic chemicals are actually produced as part of normal bodily processes. In fact, it is not uncommon for tiny


What Are Toxins?

Toxins are poisonous substances that are produced either within the body or by another organism (synthetically created ‘toxins’ are technically called toxicants).

Are Toxins Dangerous?

While they sound scary (and some are!), many toxic chemicals are actually produced as part of normal bodily processes. In fact, it is not uncommon for tiny amounts of toxins to be ingested as part of a normal healthy diet, or as a result of environmental exposure. Products that we are exposed to daily such as household cleaners, medications, alcohol, pesticides, fuel and cosmetics can all be considered toxic in certain conditions. So, it’s important to remember the old adage, the dose defines the poison!

Image of common toxins

What Are Some Common Toxins?

There are many different types of toxins, all of which vary greatly in the severity of their effect. We discuss some of the most common toxins and their effect on health below.

1.    Heavy Metals

Heavy metals are metals with high densities or atomic weights. They include nutrients such as iron, cobalt and zinc. These nutrients are essential for health and yet, are toxic in large doses. When people refer to heavy metals in the context of health, they are typically referring to metals such as lead, cadmium, arsenic and mercury. These heavy metals are toxic, even in the smallest amounts.

2.    Arsenic

Arsenic is a natural component of the earth’s crust and is widely distributed throughout the environment in the air, water and land. It is because of this that minute doses of arsenic can be found in some drinking water and foods. Interestingly, emerging research indicates that arsenic might be an essential trace nutrient 1, however elevated levels of arsenic are highly toxic and very dangerous. Based on mammalian studies, a recommended dose of arsenic per day for health is between 12.5 and 25μg, and people take in around 12-50μg per day through a normal diet1,2. The World Health Organization (WHO) has set a safe limit of <10μg /L for drinking water.

3.    Cadmium

Cadmium is a heavy metal found commonly in the environment from natural occurrence and contamination. Smokers have a high exposure to cadmium through cigarettes, while everyday foods are the highest source of cadmium for the non-smoking population. Foods contributing most to dietary cadmium are cereals and cereal products, vegetables, nuts and pulses, starchy roots or potatoes, and meat and meat products. Vegans and vegetarians can have higher exposure to this heavy metal due to their high consumption of cereals, nuts, oilseeds and pulses.

Over exposure to cadmium can cause kidney failure, bone demineralisation and be carcinogenic. The average levels of cadmium in food have been found to be ≈200μg/kg3, with a tolerable amount of 7μg/kg body weight, per week (or ≈76μg per day), being previously set by the European Food Safety Authority.

4.    Lead

Lead is a major contaminant of drinking water and food and is extremely toxic at even small doses. Once in the body, lead circulates in the blood and can be stored in the bones. The health effects from lead exposure will vary depending on a variety of factors such as a person’s age and the amount and timing of lead exposure. In infants, lead exposure has been shown to hinder neuronal development1.

5.    Mercury

Mercury poses severe risks to the development of children in utero and in early life. A tolerable amount has been set by the World Health Organization of 1.6μg/kg body weight, per week 4, or ≈17μg per day for a woman of average weight.

6.    Bisphenols

Bisphenols such as bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol S (BPS) are chemical ‘plasticisers’ that function as raw materials for the production of many plastics including storage containers, food and beverage packaging, and lacquers and sealants for a range of other products (such as the BPS containing treatments on thermal cash register receipts)5. These plasticisers have been found in food, house dust, rivers and lakes, and personal care products6,7, and have been identified in human sera, saliva, and urine8. They are known to cause appreciable health harms and are toxic to a range of animals and organisms, including humans9,10.

As knowledge of the harms of BPA have become more well known, there has been a movement towards using different bisphenols in the place of BPA. This has led to an increase in exposure to other chemicals, in particular BPAF, BPF, and BPS and this has resulted in similar or even greater levels of exposure and accumulation of these chemicals in humans11. The various bisphenols; BPA, BPAF, BPB, BPF, and BPS have been shown to exhibit anti-thyroid, oestrogenic or antiandrogenic properties along with hormone-disrupting effects, toxicity and damage to both cells and genes, reproductive toxicity, immune dysfunction, dioxin-like effects, nephrotoxicity, and neurotoxicity (toxicity to the brain and central nervous system) and are carcinogenetic (cancer-causing chemicals)1013.

7.    Glyphosate

Glyphosate (commercially often seen as “Roundup”) is an extremely common herbicide. Its use has become so common that glyphosate residue can be found in many foods, water, and commonly used products (including medical gauze, tampons and personal care products). While it has been listed as a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for Cancer Research, its effects on human health are controversial, with some claiming that the chemical is safe in the amount humans are exposed to, while others claim there are very real health risks from low-dose exposure. Overall, the effect of glyphosate on health is likely to be very complex in nature as there are potential effects on hormones, and likely detrimental effects on the microbiome, which require further research14.

Want to learn more? Read Detox Diets Part 3: How to Support Your Body’s Natural Detox Ability.

Detox Diets Part 1: Do ‘Detox’ Diets Really Work?

Detox diets are a fixture of the alternative and complementary health scene. They are extremely common and very popular but do detox diets really work? And if they do, do detox diets work as claimed to help the body eliminate dangerous and damaging toxins? Let’s look at what the science says… What Is A Detox


Detox diets are a fixture of the alternative and complementary health scene. They are extremely common and very popular but do detox diets really work? And if they do, do detox diets work as claimed to help the body eliminate dangerous and damaging toxins?

Let’s look at what the science says…

What Is A Detox Diet?

Detox diets and programs were once more commonly known as liver cleanses. They are typically promoted to rapidly ‘cleanse’ the body of toxins, usually through a combination of fasting or food restriction, and use of various nutrients and herbs to support the liver and other detoxification pathways of the body.

What Are Toxins?

Toxins are poisonous substances that are produced either within the body or by another organism (synthetically created ‘toxins’ are technically called toxicants). While they sound scary (and some are!), many toxic chemicals are actually produced as part of normal bodily processes. In fact, it is not uncommon for tiny amounts of toxins to be ingested as part of a normal healthy diet, or as a result of environmental exposure. So, it’s important to remember the old adage, the dose defines the poison!

Read our article Detox Diets Part 2: How Dangerous are Common Toxins? to learn more about common toxins and their effect on the body.

How Does The Body Detoxify?

Due to the creation of some toxic by-products in the body from metabolic processes, and the inevitability of exposure to some toxic chemicals and heavy metals in the environment, the body has developed sophisticated detoxification pathways to excrete these chemicals. The liver, kidneys, gastrointestinal system, skin and lungs all play various roles in the excretion of toxins, with various processes such as methylation, metabolism and conjugation used to produce chemical end-products that can be more easily excreted. Some chemicals are difficult to convert to excretable forms and can accumulate in the body, especially in fat tissue (like organophosphate pesticides and herbicides, and heavy metals).

Infographic with phase one and phase two liver detoxification pathways

Do Detox Diets Work?

This is an interesting question. In order to answer this, we must first understand more about the outcomes of different detox diets (the ones that have been studied at least) and whether the diets work because of, or despite of their claims.

Do Detox Diets Help The Body Eliminate ‘Toxins’?

There has been limited research conducted on the many detox diets available. A 2014 review published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics highlighted the lack of thorough, scientifically robust studies on various detox diets. While one study noted a significant improvement in self-reported symptoms associated with poor health, no placebo control was used and other outcome measures (including some markers of phase 1 and 2 liver detoxification) did not significantly differ between groups. Other studies suffered from similar methodological flaws such as lack of a control group, no randomisation, or inconsistencies in comparison groups1.

Will A Detox Help Me Lose Weight?

Many people do lose weight on detox diets. It is often claimed that this is because ‘toxins’ encourage the storage of fat, but in all likelihood, it is actually because while following a restrictive detox diet a person simply eats less. Most detox diets involve some combination of fasting, extreme food restriction or elimination of common foods, all of which result in less energy intake. As an example, a 2015 study demonstrated that the ‘Lemon Detox’ diet did help women to lose weight, but this effect was most likely due to calorie-restriction6.

Let’s face it, any time you drastically restrict calories you will lose weight…and this aspect of detox diets has little to do with toxins.

Can Certain Nutrients Improve Innate Detoxification?

While it’s unlikely that specific detox diets will help you to lose weight or detoxify any more than an otherwise good diet based on whole, natural, and unrefined foods, some nutrients might help the body to support its own innate detoxification processes and reduce the damage that toxins may cause.

Many nutrients help to support our innate detox pathways and either reduce the toxins that we accumulate or improve their elimination from the body. These include spirulina2,3,4,11,12 and chlorella10,11,12, dandelion4, folate5, alpha-lipoic acid9, glycine1 (in high doses), and a combination treatment of methionine, vitamin C and thiamine8.

The Bottom Line

It is unlikely that a detox diet will help you to remove toxins from the body or lose more weight than a good nutrition plan. Eating a wholefood diet that is rich in nutrients and low in toxins and toxicants will help to support the health and performance of the body and support your natural detoxification pathways. Additionally, certain nutrients found in the diet, or supplements such as Nuzest Good Green Stuff could also be of benefit to the amazing, innate, natural detoxification pathways of the human body. 

10 Healthy Eating Tips to Get You Back on Track this New Year, Minus the Diet.

If eating healthier is one of your top 2020 New Year’s resolutions, tackle your goal from a different perspective this year by following these 10 bite-sized healthy eating tips! The New Year offers an opportunity to eliminate bad habits and establish healthier routines. And while the New Year brings renewed motivation, this is often short


If eating healthier is one of your top 2020 New Year’s resolutions, tackle your goal from a different perspective this year by following these 10 bite-sized healthy eating tips!

The New Year offers an opportunity to eliminate bad habits and establish healthier routines. And while the New Year brings renewed motivation, this is often short lived, with many people abandoning their resolutions faster than Usain Bolt can run one hundred meters.

New Year’s resolutions typically don’t work out because people set too big of a goal for themselves. Big goals make it difficult to know where to start and as a result, motivation is lost quickly. Instead, long term success is found by setting smaller goals that can be achieved gradually over time.

1. Forget the diet.

Diets are notorious for being unnecessarily restrictive and difficult to maintain long term. There is no such thing as a perfect diet, so stop trying to achieve one. According to an article in healthwisdomsecrets.com , all foods have a place in a healthy diet…work on creating balance, not restriction.

2. Veggies are king, fruits are queen.

Vegetables and fruits are loaded with vitamins, minerals, fibre and antioxidants. Research shows that people who eat vegetables and fruits live longer and have a lower risk of developing chronic disease. Aim to eat 5 serves of vegetables and 2 serves of fruit every day!

Struggling to eat a serve of veggies at breakfast? Try our easy Breakfast Bruschetta recipe.

3. Love thy wholegrains.

Eating wholegrains as part of a healthy diet has been found to lower your risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and gastrointestinal disease. Wholegrains such as brown rice, wholegrain bread and pasta, oats and buckwheat are a great source of fibre which helps to keep your digestive system working properly. Aim to eat 4-6 serves of wholegrains every day!

4. Don’t skip on protein.

Proteins are essential nutrients. They are the building blocks of all of the cells in our body and are needed for growth and repair. Protein containing foods help to reduce cravings and promote a feeling of fullness…both of which are favourable if you are trying to lose weight! Protein can be found in foods including meat, eggs, legumes, nuts, seeds and quality protein supplements such as Nuzest Clean Lean Protein Powder.

girl making a protein smoothie

5. Eat more legumes.

Legumes are a group of plant foods that contain lentils, beans and peas. They are packed full of protein and fibre and contain an array of vitamins and minerals. Due to their nutritional profile, legumes can be considered a vegetable (thus contribute to your 5 a day target) however they are also a fantastic source of plant-based protein making them a great alternative to meat and fish.

6. Stop fearing fats.

Fats have many important functions in the body including insulation of the body and organs, regulating inflammatory and immune responses and aiding in brain development and function. Mono- and poly-unsaturated fats are considered ‘healthy fats’ as they are beneficial for our heart health. Healthy fats can be found in foods such as oily fish, olive oil, nuts, avocado and chia seeds.

Looking for a healthy dinner recipe? Try our delicious Zucchini and Sundried Tomato Frittata recipe.

7. Optimise your gut health with pre- and pro-biotics.

Pre- and pro-biotics support the body in building and maintaining a healthy gut microbiome. A healthy gut microbiome is believed to be beneficial for our immune, mental and digestive health. Prebiotics are found in fibre rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, and wholegrains. While probiotics occur in many fermented foods, including yogurt, sauerkraut, and tempeh. Aim to eat these every day to help your gut health flourish.

8. Drink up!

Water is vital for so many bodily functions. It helps to regulate your body temperature, assist your organs in flushing out toxins and aids in the circulation of blood and nutrients around the body. The average adult requires 2L of water per day to stay hydrated, so remember to drink up!

9. Eat mindfully.

Have you ever eaten a meal so quickly that you’ve gotten to the end and wondered where it all went? Switch off your screens and start paying attention to what you are eating at mealtimes. Eating in a more mindful way helps to increase meal satisfaction and has also been shown to promote weight loss and reduce binge eating.

10. Be Kind to Yourself.

Making healthy changes to your diet doesn’t happen overnight. It requires a lot of hard work and persistence! Remember to strive for balance and be kind to yourself throughout the process and beyond.

If you enjoyed these healthy eating tips, read about our top “5 exercise and lifestyle tips to create a happier and healthier you this New Year”.

Cacao – a superfood worth celebrating on World Chocolate Day!

In celebration of World Chocolate Day on July 7, here are our top seven reasons why Cacao is historically referred to as the “food of the Gods”.


Historically referred to as the “food of the Gods”, it’s no coincidence that we’re singing cacao’s praises today, on World Chocolate Day. We all know chocolate is delicious but when it comes to the superfood qualities of chocolate we must give thanks to the mighty cacao bean… that’s what we’re really talking about.

Reasons to eat celebrate cacao:

  1. Bursting with antioxidants

Raw organic cacao has 40 times more antioxidants than blueberries! Antioxidants are vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that protect our cells against free radicals that can cause cellular damage and disease.

  1. Improves heart health

Cacao is rich in plant flavonoids called flavanols. Flavanols work similarly to antioxidants in that they help repair cellular damage, and they also improve heart health by lowering blood pressure and improving blood flow to the heart and brain.

  1. Magnesium-rich food

Magnesium is an essential mineral required for over 300 enzymatic reactions in the body and aids in maintaining a healthy immune system, normal nerve and muscle function, a regular heartbeat, strong bones and the production of energy from food.

  1. Makes you feel good

When we consume cacao, our brain releases neurotransmitters giving us a natural high. Phenylethylamine (PEA) is a chemical compound our body releases naturally when we’re in love or excited and can be supplemented to treat depression. It is also one of the many feel-good chemicals cacao produces in our bodies when we eat chocolate!

  1. Improves gut health

Cacao is a high-fibre food and has the potential to not only make you feel fuller, but also keep your gut healthy and bowel movements regular!

  1. Makes you look good

The antioxidants found in cacao may also prevent wrinkles and protect the skin from the damaging effects of UV rays from the sun. Substances found in cacao promote healthy looking skin by increasing blood flow, improving skin density and hydration.

  1. Potential to fight cancer

Whilst the results are only suggestive…  researchers have investigated dark chocolate’s role in preventing the growth of cancer cells in the body, due to its rich supply of flavonoids. Suggestive is enough for us…

Nuzest Clean Lean Protein Rich Chocolate utilizes cacao powder due to its many health benefits as we’ve discussed above. Try our nourishing cacao protein latte today!

RECIPE

Ingredients:

  • 1 serve (2 scoops) Nuzest Clean Lean Protein Rich Chocolate
  • 1 tablespoon organic coconut butter
  • 300ml plant milk of choice (rice, almond, coconut, soy)
  • 50ml water
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon

Method:

  • Add your milk, water and coconut butter to a small pot and stir them slowly over a very low heat – making sure it doesn’t come to a boil
  • When very hot, add your protein and cinnamon and whisk into the milk until smooth
  • Pour into a tall mug and sprinkle a little extra cinnamon or cacao powder on top to serve

Giving up, giving in or getting smart, feeding kids in the modern world

As a naturopath and nutritionist I thought I would be great at feeding my child when I finally had one. I knew all the right things a baby and growing child should eat, I had talked to countless parents in consultations over their children’s eating habits and food ideas and I work with many teenage


As a naturopath and nutritionist I thought I would be great at feeding my child when I finally had one. I knew all the right things a baby and growing child should eat, I had talked to countless parents in consultations over their children’s eating habits and food ideas and I work with many teenage athletes with sports nutrition so I thought I was well prepared for the job. Teaching nutrition to clients is quite a different situation to feeding your own child and their myriad of friends that come over to play.

Of course I thought I would have one of those children who eats everything, happily munching on broccoli and tomatoes and getting all their important nutrients. This is where I should insert the laughing out loud emoji, as my daughter’s nutritional aspirations melted into the real struggle of trying to feed a child healthy food when they have a distinct aversion of almost any green food that exists.

Children are an interesting group of gourmet snobs, liking and disliking the same food within the same day or week. I am not talking about a baby who is happy to eat all kinds of mashed up green foods and other vegetables, they can’t speak yet and thus will happily gobble down most things on offer. I am talking about the child/teen who can clearly communicate their dislikes of almost anything you try to make them eat that may be ever so slightly on the spectrum of healthy.

In all honestly I am making this sound worse than it is, most kids, including my daughter will have their ‘select’ vegetables that they are willing to eat but often this is of limited variety and colour. The red, yellow and orange vegetables such as pumpkin, sweet potato and even tomato are often on the YES list for kids as they a much sweeter and higher in natural carbohydrates than anything resembling the colour green contains.  On a side note I once had 3 kids leave all the green coloured vegetable chips in a bowl, they were really a potato chip but came in 3 colours with a hint of vegetables used as colouring agents. No one ate the green ones! I then lined them up for a blind taste test and no one could tell the difference between the orange, yellow or green chip. Even if they had picked out the green chip in the test I think I would have fibbed and said it was the yellow one.

Yes, we all have friends who’s kids LOVE vegetables and happily eat your entire vegetable and dip platter within minutes, but in my personal and professional experience this is not the norm. I do cry myself to sleep when this happens on occasion and dream of the day my daughter would chose a broccoli floret without an ultimatum or plea. If it makes you feel any better, I also have friends who’s children live on pasta and white bread so there is hope for us all.

So enough of the talk over how kids and teens are hard to feed, the question is what to do about it. There are entire books devoted to hiding food in different pasta sauces, muffins and smoothies and I must admit this works a lot of the time. Science tells us that kids taste buds are much stronger than an adult or to be more exact, children have more taste buds than an adult, so they do have a larger reaction to bitter greens and vegetables than an adult would. What can you do to feed your picky eater a healthier diet I hear you ask? Below is the list of my top ways to get picky eaters eating.

  1. Chop vegetables into very small pieces and blend into sauces
  2. Make muffins using such ingredients as carrots and zucchini etc. there are some fabulous recipes on the internet. Please remember carrot cake and banana bread are not really healthy even though they sound it.
  3. Keep trying, it can take 20 times for a child to try a food before they start to like it
  4. Smoothies are a great way to get both fruit and vegetables into a child and most kids love a meal you can have with a straw, just make sure its not all fruit or dairy, use a variety of liquids to see what they prefer and get an avocado or some spinach into the mix
  5. Multivitamin powders/smoothies. There are great products on the market like Nuzest’s Kids Good Stuff that have taken all the hard work out of the equation for you, blending fruits, vegetables and pea protein into a nutrient dense ready made smoothie or powder, these are a go to for me, especially when short of time. These are trialled and tested and taste friendly for small people.
  6. Popsicles are a great way to use leftover smoothies that become a fantastic afternoon or after dinner treat. My daughter loves helping me make them as well
  7. Getting your kids/teens involved in the kitchen, cutting, mixing and helping in general. I find the more my daughter helps with a meal the more she is willing to try new things and eat a greater variety. I often teach her about the nutritional value of what we are eating and that makes it more inspiring for her to try something new or different.
  8. Baked vegetables are a favourite at my house, cut them into shapes resembling chips/fries if you need to give them the extra motivation.
  9. Eating with family and friends. Sitting down and having a proper meal with family can motivate kids to try new things when they get to see others eating and enjoying the food. Not rushing meals, eating in front of the TV or eating in the car can go a long way to great food habits.
  10. Removing packaged and sugary foods from the diet will eventually break the ‘triggers’ for sweet foods and allow the taste buds to be stimulated by other flavours.
  11. Education is key. Explaining why healthy food is important and what it can do for a growing body I find to be great motivation for kids and teens. I love when I get to over hear them explaining what you taught them to their friends too.

My last piece of advice is to not underestimate how much they do want to try and be healthy, sometimes their taste buds just need to calm down a bit and we as parents needs to find some patience and healthy fun options rather than getting frustrated by the whole thing and giving in to junk food instead.

Acid-Alkaline Balance and Diet

Your body needs to remain ever so slightly alkaline (the opposite to acidic) to survive. One of the simplest ways to stay in perfect pH balance is through diet and alkaline-forming foods. Naturopath Cliff Harvey explains the importance of acid/alkaline balance in your diet.


Your body needs to remain ever so slightly alkaline (the opposite to acidic) to survive. One of the simplest ways to stay in perfect pH balance is through diet, protein supplements and alkaline-forming foods. But if you were to Buy Isagenix Online, you can fuse your diet and supplements together, and can better maintain your body’s pH balance and also keep those flabs of fat from forming.

Whatever we eat is digested and broken down into much smaller compounds: proteins into their constituent amino acids, long chain carbs into simple sugars such as fructose, glucose and galactose and fats into glycerides and fatty acids. There are also many non-caloric (not energy providing) components of the food we digest and these also exhibit effects on the body.An area that has garnered some interest recently, especially in complementary medicine and holistic nutrition fields is that of the acid-base (or acid-alkaline) balance of the foods that we eat.

The various compounds that result from digestion and end up circulating through our bodies for eventual utilisation and/or excretion will be either acidic or alkaline. If we eat a lot of foods that are (net) acid forming in the body and few that are alkaline we will create a level of what has been called ‘low grade metabolic acidosis’.It is not technically correct to say that the blood ‘will become overly acidic’ as many claim, because blood pH, and cellular pH is one of the most tightly controlled mechanisms in the body, however there are significant general health effects from having a diet that is too acidic and many of these stem from our need to ‘buffer’ blood and cells that are potentially too acidic (bring them back to normal range.)

Some of the ways the body seeks to maintain normal pH:

  • Breaking down bone tissue to supply calcium (a highly basic compound), potentially weakening bones.
  • Breaking down muscle to free up glutamine a highly basic amino acid and the most abundant amino in muscle tissue. This may result in lower levels of muscle mass, impaired recovery and reduce glutamine stores that may also play a role in immunity and gut health.

When blood pH is elevated, even fractionally, there may be additional effects of greater inflammation and increased insulin resistance, both of which are co-factors in the development of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other metabolic disorders.

Food can be analysed for its net effect on the body’s acid-alkaline balance using a measure known as Potential Renal Acid Load or in short it’s PRAL score.

Food Item PRAL value*
Cheeses (more than 15g protein/100g serving) 23.6
Meat and meat products 9.5
Cheeses (less than 15g protein/100g serving) 8
Fish 7.9
White Flour 7
Pasta 6.7
White Bread 3.5
Milk and other (non-cheese) dairy products 1
Fats and Oils 0
Vegetables -2.8
Fresh fruit and juices -3.1
Potatoes -4

*PRAL values provided in mEq per 100g edible portion

Good Green Stuff is a highly alkaline supplement that can help the body to redress its acid-alkaline imbalance.

Golden pea protein isolate is the world’s ONLY alkaline protein. Clean Lean Protein – the alkaline advantage, has a pH reading of 7.8!

Brain-Boosting Good Green Stuff

Juggling the endless tasks we need to get through each day can often mean that our memory for remembering details is not always great. Nutritionist Jamie Rose Chambers explains how our Good Green Stuff assists brain function.


Juggling the endless tasks we need to get through each day can often mean that our memory for remembering details is not always great. How often do you forget passwords, phone numbers, even just why on earth you walked into the room? Mental function is impaired when we’re stressed and tired; and declines as a natural part of the aging process that (scarily) begins around the age of forty.

The great news is that our brains are able to be trained. With the right nutrition and environment they can build new brain cells and slow cognitive decline. For centuries, herbs have also been used to boost memory and cognition and now there is strong research to support their use in improving attention, cognitive processing and memory by activating neurotransmitters and protecting damage to neurons that cause mental decline.

The following herbs you can find in NuZest’s Good Green Stuff – scientifically supported, memory-boosting herbs – just one of the plethora of benefits to taking your Good Green Stuff every day!

Panax Ginseng Extract – aids in concentration and enhanced mental function by activating neurotransmitters

Rhodiola Rosea – recognised as one of the best memory-boosting herbs, it enhances physical and mental performance and helps to retain a higher level of mental function by stimulating the central nervous system

Gotu Kola – thought to be able to improve blood flow to the brain, thereby enhancing memory and brain function

Sunflower lecithin – plays a role in nerve function so may be beneficial for neurological performance

Orgranic Chlorella – may help to prevent the progression of mental decline

Rosemary Leaf extract – traditionally used for improved memory, it also acts as an antioxidant, neutralising free radicals.

 

Good Green Stuff can be used as simply as adding two teaspoons to a glass of water, but if you want to get creative, visit our recipes section for ideas and inspiration.